What Will Be on the End of the Semester Concept Test

Draft

  • The 7 habits of the creative mind – Habits
  • The 4 devices you can use to connect parts of writing together – TS/IS
  • Voice markers – TS/IS
  • Signal phrases – TS/IS
  • Quotation framing – TS/IS
  • Annotation: name/describe basic, intermediate, advanced strategies
  • Templates for “who cares” – TS/IS
  • Templates for “so what” – TS/IS
  • Naysayers – TS/IS
  • Miller & Jurecic’s two purposes for the kind of writing we’re learning this semester – Habits
  • Essential/supporting Questions – Handout
  • Keys to writing a good introduction – Burke/Habits | The “template-of-templates” in TS/IS
  • Keys to writing a good conclusion – Habits
  • The value of writing without a thesis/writing to a question – Habits
  • The power of “And,” “But” and “Or” – Habits
  • 4 relationships between texts, answers, and you – Handout
  • 3 kinds of text-to-connections
  • TREAC – Handout
  • Barclay’s Formula – Handout
  • 3 parts of an MLA citation – Little Seagull

Homework Pro Tips

Homework Pro Tips

  • TL;DR doesn’t apply on this webpage. Actively read every word of the homework instructions, paying particular attention to the action words (often highlighted in bold).
  • Preview the homework at the end of class (or immediately after) to see how long it’s going to take you to complete it, how challenging you think it might be, and to get any questions you might have answered. Then, make an entry into your weekly calendar committing yourself to a time to complete your homework.
  • Do the homework in the order listed.
  • Set a timer for the designated “time-on-task” and give your complete highly-focused single-tasking attention to your work for the full amount of time, even if you feel like you’ve finished early. Use the remaining time to go back and look for ways to improve what you’ve written or better understand or apply what you’ve read.

Types of Questions

  • Questions to generate ideas, lines of inquiry, other questions, more conversation
  • Questions to check understanding
  • Questions to define or explore key terms (concepts)
  • Questions to shift the direction of a conversation, redefine a problem, or look at phenomena through a different lens
  • Questions to seek out other or alternative perspectives
  • Questions to make connections

Question Stems

  • Why do _______? Why does _______? Why are _______?
  • How do _______? How does _______? How has _______? How are _______? How can _______? How is _______?
  • Who does _______? Who can _______? Who will _______? Who should _______?
  • What do _______? What does _______?
  • What if _______?
  • If _______, how can/does/will _______?
  • If _______, then _______?
  • When do _______? When does _______? When is _______?
  • Where do _____? Where does _____?
  • When you see _______, how do you know _______?
  • What do you think about _______? What do you mean when you say_______?
  • How should we think about _______?
  • How do you know that _______?
  • What was the cause of _______?
  • Why do _______? Why does _______?
  • How many _______?
  • How might you _______?
  • Is it possible that _______?
  • What percentage of _______?
  • Are you saying that _______?
  • Do you mean that _______?
  • How does_______ actually operate in _______?
  • What does_______ mean?
  • What is_______ about?
  • What kind _______?
  • Who has _______? Who does _______?
  • What makes _______? Who makes _______?
  • What can be done about _______?
  • Is ____ the same as/different from/better than _______?
  • Do we really need _______?
  • How does _____ affect _____?
  • How does _____ change? How does _____ change ______?
  • What is the reason that _____?
  • What can _____ teach us about _____?
  • How does _______ connect/relate to _______?