SAS 011 Writing Lab Syllabus

The University of New England | F2020

Course Description | Learning Goals | Course Outline | Grading | Official Course Description

Welcome to UNE

What Every First-Year Nor’Easter Needs to Know

What is SAS 011 Writing Lab?

SAS 011: Writing Lab is a course that supports students with developmental writing placements as they complete ENG 110, UNE’s first-year academic writing course.

Students enrolled in Writing Lab meet weekly with a professional writing coach individually or in very small groups at a time arranged in consultation with students. The course earns 1 credit that counts toward full-time enrollment but does not satisfy core curriculum or graduation requirements. The course grade is computed into students’ cumulative grade point average.

In SAS 011, students work on goals and tasks that are closely aligned to goals and work of English Composition. Working closely with writing support coaches, students learn to adopt a more persistent, mindful, and reflective approach to their learning. They develop more robust reading and writing processes. They also practice with sophisticated language structures that enable them to express complex ideas and integrate their ideas with those of other writers.

UNE Students Talk about Writing Lab

Writing Lab students typically find They Say/I Say by Graff & Birkenstein useful.

Learning Goals

  1. Students will develop growth mindset beliefs about academic reading and writing tasks. A proficient first-year student with a growth mindset about academic reading and writing
    • Is willing to change behaviors and habits to improve
    • Embraces practice and work as keys to learning
    • Persists in the face of struggle, challenge, and error
    • Sees mistakes as opportunities for reflection, learning, and growth
    • Comes to class and sessions consistently, is willing and prepared to learn
    • Accepts and incorporates constructive feedback
  2. Students will develop a reliable active reading process. A proficient first-year academic reader
    • Analyzes the reading situation
    • Locates author’s argument and conversation partners
    • Marks up texts for comprehension and response
    • “Talks back” to the text with chunky margin comments
    • Chooses to work with passages that are complex, difficult, ambiguous, or in need of discussion or response
    • Uses a variety of writing-to-learn strategies for comprehension and conversation
    • Makes connections among multiple texts, makes text-to-self and text-to-world connections
  3. Students will develop fluency in a range of practices supporting a multi-stage recursive writing process. A proficient first-year academic writer
    • Prewrites
      • Analyzes assignment and writing situation
      • Embraces freewriting and other writing-to-learn strategies
      • Sees reading and annotation as an essential part of their academic writing process
    • Drafts and Revises
      • Writes idea-generating, exploratory drafts
      • Embraces global revision as a transformative process
    • Participates in Peer Review
    • Edits and Polishes
      • Uses a variety of effective local editing and polishing strategies
  4. Students will practice using language features capable of expressing and generating complex ideas. A proficient first-year academic writer
    • Puts aside the 5-paragraph essay in favor of trying out essay structures that can handle more complex thinking
    • Understands and uses the four fundamental sentence structures: simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
    • Combines ideas or actions in two (or more) sentences using subordination and coordination
    • Experiments with sentence templates to try out characteristic moves of academic writing
    • Uses a variety of purposeful reporting/signal verbs (beyond states, writes, or says)
    • Uses signpost language, pivot words, transitions, evaluative metawords, and voice/attitude markers
    • Uses TRIAC paragraph structure
    • Uses Barclay’s Formula to put two or more writers in conversation
  5. Students will develop strategies for integrating their own ideas with those of other writers and thinkers. A proficient first-year integrator of ideas
    • Uses ideas of others to advance a project of his or her own
    • Chooses purposefully among summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation
    • Introduces and explains borrowed passages, connects them to other passages, ideas, or claims
    • Uses signal phrasing and parenthetical citations to indicate borrowed passages
    • Uses passages as exhibits and evidence
    • Enters into conversation with others by making claims about and in response to the ideas of others
  6. Students will develop the understanding that languages and discourses evolve, are imbued with social assumptions, have social implications, and make claims to power. A first-year student with this understanding
    • Can recognize some different academic discourses and some of the values and ways of saying-being-doing-valuing-believing associated with them
    • Understands that all people’s home languages are capable of expressing complex thoughts
    • Is willing to work to understand discourses and home languages other than their own
    • Is willing to acquire fluency in discourses other than their own primary (or home) discourse
    • Makes connections between discourses in which they are fluent and those in which they are not
    • Understand that people can be persuaded by a wide range of techniques
    • Understand that what people find persuasive is context-sensitive
  7. Students will begin the process of being enculturated to the values, practices, expectations, and habits of mind characteristics of the academic communities at UNE and beyond. A first-year student starting this process will
    • Start to recognize the similarities and differences between their home culture(s) and the cultures of the university
    • Start to recognize the similarities and differences between the cultures and habits of mind of secondary schools and the cultures and habits of mind of the university
    • Develop some strategies for coping with the uncertainty, anxiety, or doubt that may accompany these recognitions
    • Begin to feel comfortable in their ability to adapt to and belong to the University’s academic communities
    • Become familiar with important concepts, tools, and resources to assist them in making the transition to college.

Course Outline

  • Engaging with Texts (reading strategies, annotation, “conversation” with the text)
  • Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation
  • Supporting a Claim with Evidence (incorporating source material)
  • Synthesizing Ideas (integration of multiple sources while drafting)
  • Understanding Drafting Expectations (prompts, pre-writing strategies, first drafts, final drafts)
  • Effective Peer Review (strategies to offer specific suggestions and feedback)
  • Revision Strategies
  • Sentence Structures, Grammar, and Punctuation 
  • Curating Digital Identities

Grading

SAS 011 Writing Lab is a credit-bearing course. You will earn a grade for Writing Lab that is separate from the grade you earn in ENG 110. While it is possible that your grades may align, it may be that your grade in Writing Lab will be higher or lower than your ENG 110 grade.

In Writing Lab, your grade is based on your presence, preparation, and engagement in Writing Lab class sessions and your evolving fluency in course learning objectives

  1. Students who earn an A in Writing Lab will tend to
    • Attend at least 12 of 14 Writing Lab sessions with their Writing Lab instructor
    • Consistently attempt ENG 110 homework before attending Lab
    • Consistently have readings and other course materials in their possession during Lab.
    • Consistently have read readings assigned in ENG 110 before attending Lab
    • Consistently be an active participant in Lab activities
    • Consistently experiment with and implement reading and writing strategies suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Develop a sense of agency and ownership about what aspects of their reading and writing to work on in Lab sessions and enthusiastically use the opportunity to develop the aspects of their reading and writing suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make significant progress developing fluency on almost all of the course learning goals
  2. Students who earn a B in Writing Lab will tend to
    • Attend at least 10 of 14 Writing Lab sessions with their Writing Lab instructor
    • Often attempt ENG 110 homework before attending Lab, with the exception of just a few sessions
    • Often have readings and other course materials in their possession during Lab, with the exception of just a few sessions
    • Often have read readings assigned in ENG 110 before attending Lab, with the exception of just a few sessions
    • Often be an active participant in Lab activities, with the exception of just a few sessions
    • Often experiment with and implement reading and writing strategies suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make good use of the opportunity to develop the aspects of their reading and writing suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make significant progress developing fluency on many of the course learning goals
  3. Students who earn a C in Writing Lab will tend to
    • Attend at least 8 of 14 Writing Lab sessions with their Writing Lab instructor
    • Sometimes attempt ENG 110 homework before attending Lab, more often than not
    • Sometimes have readings and other course materials in their possession during Lab, more often than not
    • Sometimes have read readings assigned in ENG 110 before attending Lab, more often than not
    • Sometimes be an active participant in Lab activities, more often than not
    • Sometimes experiment with and implement reading and writing strategies suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Sometimes make good use of the opportunity to develop the aspects of their reading and writing suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make some progress developing fluency on some of the course learning goals
  4. Students who earn a D in Writing Lab will tend to
    • Attend at least 8 of 14 Writing Lab sessions with their Writing Lab instructor
    • Attempt ENG 110 homework before attending Lab in fewer than half of the Lab sessions
    • Have readings and other course materials in their possession during Lab in fewer than half of the Lab sessions
    • Have read readings assigned in ENG 110 before attending Lab in fewer than half of the Lab sessions
    • Be an active participant in Lab activities in fewer than half of the Lab sessions
    • Rarely experiment with and implement reading and writing strategies suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Rarely make good use of the opportunity to develop the aspects of their reading and writing suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make some or a little progress on a few of the course learning goals
  5. Students who earn an F in Writing Lab will tend to
    • Attend fewer than 8 of 14 Writing Lab sessions with their Writing Lab instructor
    • Very rarely attempt ENG 110 homework before attending Lab
    • Very rarely have readings and other course materials in their possession during Lab sessions
    • Very rarely have read readings assigned in ENG 110 before attending Lab
    • Very rarely be an active participant in Lab activities
    • Very rarely experiment with and implement reading and writing strategies suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Very rarely make good use of the opportunity to develop the aspects of their reading and writing suggested by their Writing Lab instructor
    • Make little progress on the course learning goals

Official Course Description

This developmental level course is designed to support students enrolled in English Composition. The course focus is on writing as a process, using engagement with and responses to text as its content while simultaneously achieving developmental objectives. Credit counts toward full-time enrollment, but does not satisfy core curriculum or graduation requirements. Course grade is computed into students’ cumulative grade point average. For matriculated students only. 1.000 Credit hours